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Black American Soldiers in the Civil War by Matthew Elliott » I For Color

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Black American Soldiers in the Civil War by Matthew Elliott

What it was like for Black American soldiers during the Civil War and and the events of the War that defined them?

majpiersonzz

 

Black American soldiers had been around long before the outbreak of the Civil War.  During the Revolutionary War, slaves joined up where they could to fight for this vision of freedom their masters spoke so highly of, hoping they too could earn their freedom. Originally George Washington and other leaders in the Continental Army did not want slaves fighting with them on the battle fields of the colonies. Washington was admit on making the War about freedom from England, not about slavery. He feared if he got the concept of slavery involved, we would lose support from some of the southern colonies. The British on the other hand had no such fear. They welcomed the use of slaves to fight, and even promised a deal of freedom with service.

”In November 1775 Lord Dunmore, royal governor of Virginia, issued a proclamation promising freedom for any enslaved black in Virginia who joined the British army. Within a month, nearly three hundred slaves had joined what would be known as “Lord Dunmore’s Ethiopian Regiment.” Later, thousands of slaves fled plantations for British promises of emancipation. At the end of the war, the British kept their word, to some at least, and evacuated as many as fourteen thousand “Black Loyalists” to Nova Scotia, Jamaica, and England.

”In November 1775 Lord Dunmore, royal governor of Virginia, issued a
proclamation promising freedom for any enslaved black in Virginia who
joined the British army. Within a month, nearly three hundred slaves
had joined what would be known as “Lord Dunmore’s Ethiopian Regiment.”
Later, thousands of slaves fled plantations for British promises of
emancipation. At the end of the war, the British kept their word, to
some at least, and evacuated as many as fourteen thousand “Black
Loyalists” to Nova Scotia, Jamaica, and England.”