Emmett Louis Till by Thinh H. Truong

 

Although the media really wanted to involve in this story, Milam and Bryant did not have to worry since Mississippi citizens did not support the outsiders, especially the black or Northern people, interfering their local cases. Many attendants even shook hands and wished Milam luck.[8]

During the testimony, Moses Wright was the first person to witness. He pointed to Milam, and claimed that was the guy on August 28th night with a gun and took Emmett Till away.

Moses Wright's testimony in the trial of his great-nephew's accused killers would go down in history as one of the bravest moments of the civil rights movement.

Moses Wright’s testimony in the trial of his great-nephew’s accused killers would go down in history as one of the bravest moments of the civil rights movement.

Understanding that no colored person had ever directly charged a white man in court, Wright still stood up in front of many angry white people on that day. “That was the first time in my life I was brave enough to charge a white man. That was not a bravery act nor did I not fear. I just want justice”, he said. The next person to testify was Mrs. Till. With a surprising calm voice, she answered every question without any hesitation. To defend against people who did not believe the found body was Emmett Till, Mamie Till confirmed that the ring with “L.T” engraved on it was from Emmett Till’s father. As all the evidences against Milam and Bryant were proved, a twisted event happened.[9]

112 Yr Old Mississippi Woman Waits for Word on Emmett Till Murder Trial - Jet Magazine, October 6, 1955

112 Yr Old Mississippi Woman Waits for Word on Emmett Till Murder Trial – Jet Magazine, October 6, 1955

             The chief police officer of Tallahatchie County, H.C. Strider was called to testify for the defendants. When being asked of the dead body, Strider claimed that it was impossible to identify the person even the color of his skin. And with just that claim, Mr J.A. Shaw, the jury foreman, read the verdict: “Not guilty!”

Roy Bryant (left), smokes a cigar as his wife happily embraces him. His half brother, J.W. Milam and his wife show jubilation. Bryant and Milam were cleared by an all white, male jury of the charge of having murdered Till, a 14-year-old Chicago boy who was black. The jury was out just one hour and 7 minutes.

Roy Bryant (left), smokes a cigar as his wife happily embraces him. His half brother, J.W. Milam and his wife show jubilation. Bryant and Milam were cleared by an all white, male jury of the charge of having murdered Till, a 14-year-old Chicago boy who was black. The jury was out just one hour and 7 minutes.

More then ever, Americans seemed to be upset with the ridiculous result. During an interview with Chicago Defender after the trial, Miame Till said: “This is the biggest joke I have ever witnessed.” Even Mrs. Eleanor Rooservelt, the First Lady, had to speak up about the final verdict. She hoped that the United States of America need to prove itself as an iconic figure of liberty, with justice must be served. Although African Americans lost their support in Emmett Till’s murder in court, they finally showed the rest of world why the Civil Rights Movement was necessary.  Months later, protected by the double jeopardy rule, Bryant and Milam admitted to killing Emmett Till in an interview with Look Magazine in 1956. During the interview, Bryant and Milam even showed some disrespects towards Till’s death as why people tried to keep the boy’s image live on.