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Lorraine Vivian Hansberry

In 1973, Neminoff and Charlotte Zaltzberg adapted Hansberry’s first play, A Raisin in the Sun, into a musical entitled Raisin, which won the Tony Award as the best musical and ran on Broadway for nearly three years.

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RASIN Playblll

After the success of A Raisin in the Sun on the Great White Way, Nemiroff teamed up with Charlotte Zaltzberg to write the book for a musical adaptation of Hansberry’s groundbreaking play. Judd Woldin and Robert Brittan wrote the score, a mix of jazz, blues, gospel and of course, traditional musical theater. “It is a strange [musical] but a good one,” The New York Times reported. “It warms the heart and touches the soul.” Starring Joe Morton as Walter Lee, Ernestine Jackson as Ruth and Virginia Capers as Mama Lena, Raisin won two Tony Awards, including Best Musical.

Debbie Allen, Ernestine Jackson and Joe Morton in a scene from the show (Photo: Martha Swope)

After the success of A Raisin in the Sun on the Great White Way, Nemiroff teamed up with Charlotte Zaltzberg to write the book for a musical adaptation of Hansberry’s groundbreaking play. Judd Woldin and Robert Brittan wrote the score, a mix of jazz, blues, gospel and of course, traditional musical theater. “It is a strange [musical] but a good one,” The New York Times reported. “It warms the heart and touches the soul.” Starring Joe Morton as Walter Lee, Ernestine Jackson as Ruth and Virginia Capers as Mama Lena, Raisin won two Tony Awards, including Best Musical.

Joe Morton and Debbie Allen

Joe Morton and Debbie Allen

Debbie Allen, Ernestine Jackson, and Virginia Capers in a scene from the show (Photo: Martha Swope)

Debbie Allen, Ernestine Jackson, and Virginia Capers in a scene from the show (Photo: Martha Swope)

Ralph Carter, (foreground), and Virginia Capers along with Ernestine Jackson, (R), his proud grandmother and mother, are shown watching him in this church scene in the new musical Raisin which premiered on October 18, 1973, at the 46th Street Theater. Donald McKayle was the director-choreographer. Robert Nemiroff was the producer.

Ralph Carter, (foreground), and Virginia Capers along with Ernestine Jackson, (R), his proud grandmother and mother, are shown watching him in this church scene in the new musical Raisin which premiered on October 18, 1973, at the 46th Street Theater. Donald McKayle was the director-choreographer. Robert Nemiroff was the producer.

Ralph Carterand Ernestine Jackson

Ralph Carterand Ernestine Jackson

1974 Press Photo Ernestine Jackson and Ralph Carter in musical "Raisin"

1974 Press Photo Ernestine Jackson and Ralph Carter in musical “Raisin”

 Raisin was revived in 1981, when Claudia McNeil, who had played Lena in the original 1959 production, helped recreate the musical adaptation.

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On the 30-year anniversary of the beloved drama's Broadway premiere, PBS aired an uncut, three-hour TV adaptation of A Raisin in the Sun starring Danny Glover and Esther Rolle. Director Bill Duke told The Los Angeles Times, "This play transcends time and race. It applies to all poor people. What Lorraine says is something that should be said often: Folks that don't have money, folks that society looks down its nose at, are some of the noblest spirits among us."

On the 30-year anniversary of the beloved drama’s Broadway premiere, PBS aired an uncut, three-hour TV adaptation of A Raisin in the Sun starring Danny Glover and Esther Rolle. Director Bill Duke told The Los Angeles Times, “This play transcends time and race. It applies to all poor people. What Lorraine says is something that should be said often: Folks that don’t have money, folks that society looks down its nose at, are some of the noblest spirits among us.”

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In 1989, A Raisin in the Sun, was adapted into a movie starring Danny Glover, the profound African American actor, well known and respected for his various roles in films including The Color Purple, and Esther Rolle, who is best known for her role as Florida Evans on the CBS sitcom Good Times. This production, based on an Off-Broadway revival, received three Emmy Award nominations; all of which were for technical categories. In 2004, A Raisin in the Sun was revived for the first and only time on Broadway at the Royal Theatre.

Raisin_in_the_Sun_2008 This version of Lorraine Hansberry’s play had a cast consisting of prominent African-American actors and figures such as Sean Combs, Audra McDonald, Phylicia Rashad, and Sanaa Lathan.  It ran at the Royale Theatre for 31 previews and 89 performances. McDonald and Rashad both won the Tony Award and Drama Desk Award for their performances, and Lathan was honored with the prestigious Theatre World Award.

The Shubert Organization
Royale Theatre
New York City, NY
Opening-April 26, 2004
Closing-July 11, 2004

Directed: Kenny Leon
Set design: Thomas Lynch
Costume design: Paul Tazewell
Lighting design: Brian MacDevitt
Sound design:T. Richard Fitzgerald
Composer: Dwight Andrews

Cast:
Walter Lee Younger – Sean Combs
Ruth Younger – Audra McDonald
Travis Younger – Alexander Mitchell
Lena Younger (Mama) – Phylicia Rashad
Beneatha Younger – Sanaa Latahn
Joseph Asagai -Teagle F. Bougere
George Murchinson – Frank Harts
Bobo – Bill Nunn
Karl Lindner – David Aaron Baker
Moving Men-Lawrence Ballard, Billy Eugene Jones

Reviews
”Raisin in the Sun” depicts Walter Lee’s belated emergence into manhood. And in his opening scene — as he pouts and teases with his wife, Ruth (Ms. McDonald) — Mr. Combs’s Walter evokes a man who in his 30’s is still marooned in early adolescence. You might even mistake this Walter for the older brother of Travis (Alexander Mitchell), the little boy who is in fact his son. Clearly, Mr. Combs has left lots of space for Walter to grow. Unfortunately, that space is never filled.

This omission makes the revival a lopsided and ultimately dreary affair. Though the production features sterling work from Ms. McDonald and Ms. Rashad, who plays Walter Lee’s formidable mother, it lacks the fully developed central performance from Mr. Combs that would hold the show together. This Walter Lee never appears to change, in big ways or small. Happy or sad, drunk or sober, angry or placating, his evenly measured words and debating team captain’s gestures remain pretty much the same.

This is a significant problem, since Walter Lee is meant to represent a new generational spirit among African-Americans in a time of social transition. And neither Mr. Combs nor the exceptionally pretty Sanaa Lathan — as Walter Lee’s ambitious sister, Beneatha, who is studying to be a doctor — makes an argument for this generation as one to pin your hopes on.

From beginning to end, they register as petulant, spoiled overgrown children with none of the complexity of the maternal figures played by Ms. McDonald and Ms. Rashad. This ”Raisin” is all about the kids versus the grown-ups, and not in the sense that Hansberry meant it. Instead of contrasting the forces of conservative, God-fearing womanhood with a fresh revolutionary spirit, the show becomes an ungainly counterpoint of mature and callow acting styles.
http://theater.nytimes.com/mem/theater/treview.html?res=9e02e6d7103af934a15757c0a9629c8b63&scp=9&sq=a%20raisin%20in%20the%20sun%20hansberry&st=cse

Then there’s Combs, a music star who has appeared in a couple of movies but has no real stage experience. It shows. He has a tendency to act by protruding his lips, but seldom does much with the rest of his face, body, or voice. More importantly, he doesn’t have a firm grasp on Walter’s dreams; a major part of the plot concerns Walter’s desire to buy a liquor store, but his emotional state doesn’t seem to change whether he just desires it, sees the opportunity slip away, or experiences the final result of his attempts. The rest of Walter’s major moments receive similarly ineffective treatment.

It can’t be easy for Combs to share the stage with his three extraordinary co-stars, and he deserves a great amount of respect for being willing to take on such a challenging role. But Combs’s work is so unconvincing and his Walter so unspecific, he seems like a bystander rather than active participant in the action. During his scenes with Lathan, McDonald, and Rashad, he looks and sounds completely out of his element.

During these times – and when Combs is not onstage – the lead women’s talents keep the play soaring higher and higher. Everyone else – including Leon, Lynch, Fitzgerald, costume designer Paul Tazewell, lighting designer Brian MacDevitt, and all the other actors – keeps A Raisin in the Sun at that high level from beginning to end. If Combs’s contributions prevent this production from being absolutely perfect, overall, it still feels like a dream come blissfully true.http://www.talkinbroadway.com/world/RaisinSun.html