Samuel Légitimus



In 1992 he began to study his roots (as the worthy great-grandson of Hégésippe Jean Légitimus, the first Black elected deputy in history) and discovered a passion for human rights, especially those of minority groups. 

 

 

Hégésippe Légitimus

Hégésippe Légitimus

Hégésippe Jean Légitimus at the Palais Bourbon
“Hégésippe Jean Légitimus (born April 8, 1868, in Pointe-à-Pitre, Guadeloupe, and died November 29, 1944, in Angles-sur-l’Anglin, France) was a socialist politician from Guadeloupe who served in the French National Assembly from 1898–1902 and from 1906-1914.[1][2]
Légitimus was the first black man elected to the French parliament since Jean-Baptiste Belley in 1793. Up until 1898 the colonies and territoires d’Outre-Mer had only been represented by white or mixed-race, or “béké” deputies.[3] Légitimus was followed shortly afterward by other Black deputies, Gratien Candace, Blaise Diagne, Ngalandou Diouf, Achille René-Boisneuf and Maurice Satineau. Légitimus was one of the founders of the Parti Ouvrier, the socialist party of Guadaloupe, which was politically aligned with that of mainland France.[4][5]
Hégésippe Légitimus devant le Palais Bourbon. circa 1930

Hégésippe Légitimus devant le Palais Bourbon. circa 1930

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