Emmett Louis Till

 

On August 24th, 1955, arriving in Mississippi, Emmett Till and his friends went to a White-owned grocery in the small hamlet of Money. Apparently, Till had been familiar with white friends especially white girls — and the local kids, who could not believe what they heard, dared him to enter the store and flirt with Carolyn Bryant, the white woman who was the owner’s wife. “Some say he “wolf-whistled” at Bryant; others say he grabbed her hand and asked her for a date; still others claim he did nothing more than simply say “bye, baby” to her as he left the store. Whatever Till did, it was apparent to all involved that he had done something that made Carolyn Bryant angry or afraid.”[3] Till and his friends ran away from the store as Mrs. Bryant went to get her gun. Unfortunately for Emmett Till, racial segregation was still a sensitive issue in the Southern States like Mississippi.

Carolyn Bryant

Carolyn Bryant

Carolyn and Roy Bryant

Carolyn and Roy Bryant

The talk down between Emmett Till and Carolyn Bryant went to her husband’s ears. On August 28th 1955, Roy Bryant and his brother, Milam, went to the house of Till’s uncle and took the boy away right in front of Wright’s eyes.

Roy Bryant

Roy Bryant

J. W. Milam

J. W. Milam

MONEY, Miss. — Along the edge of Money Road, across from the railroad tracks, an old grocery store rots.

In August 1955, a 14-year-old Black boy visiting from Chicago walked in to buy candy. After being accused of whistling at the white woman behind the counter, he was later kidnapped, tortured, lynched, and dumped in the Tallahatchie River.

The murder of Emmett Till is remembered as one of the most hideous hate crimes of the 20th century, a brutal episode in American history that helped kindle the civil rights movement. And the place where it all began, Bryant’s Grocery & Meat Market, is still standing. Barely.

Today, the store is crumbling, roofless, and covered in vines. On several occasions, preservationists, politicians, and business leaders — even the State of Mississippi — have tried to save its remaining four walls. But no consensus has been reached.”  NY TIMES

 

Bryant Grocery & Meat Market

Bryant Grocery & Meat Market 

https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2019/02/20/us/emmett-till-murder-legacy.html?smid=fb-nytimes&smtyp=pay&smvar=ADAR&fbclid=IwAR0jdaO9xT7UvOKG_ifRbRY8sWJPoevOZx6u4cx3P-g2HhZmZ76XQqVuOdo