Louis Johnson

  Page 9

~ ***** ~

LOUIS and Friends 

Louis Johnson and Maurice Hines

Maurice Hines and Louis Johnson

Obba Babatundé and Louis Johnson

Louis Johnson and Adrian Bailey

David Robertson and Louis Johnson

MELBA MOORE, LOUIS JOHNSON and GEORGE FAISON

Louis Johnson, Steve Carter, and Edmund Cambridge.
Photo courtesy of Clinton Turner Davis.

George Faison, Andy Torres, and Louis Johnson.  Photo courtesy of Andy Torres

 
Lee Summers, Franz Jones, Leslie Dockery, Bruce Hawkins, Louis Johnson, Jeffery V. Thompson, Maurice Hines Jr and Natalie Carter-Prince.

Lee Summers, Franz Jones, Leslie Dockery, Bruce Hawkins, Louis Johnson, Jeffery V. Thompson, Maurice Hines Jr, and Natalie Carter-Prince.

Adrian Bailey, Bruce Heath, Martial Roumain, Dyane Harvey-Salaam, Bruce Hawkins, Ted D Williams, Brian Anthony Johnson, and George Faison at Faison Firehouse Theater.

Allison Williams Foster, Fred Benjamin. Ted D Williams, Louis Johnson and Brenda Braxton


Jill Williams, Ramona Candy, Louis Johnson and Sylvia Levy.

Dyane Harvey, Mabel Robinson, and Louis Johnson

Dr. Glory Van Scott, Denise Du Maine, Nikki Williams, Rhonda McLean-nur, David Robertson and Melony McGant with Louis Johnson

.
Moments with Great Artists, Dancers, Leaders & Scholars at La Boule Blanche in Celebration of Katherine Dunham’s Book KAISO with Dr. Glory Van Scott and Micki Grant and Charles Rangel. Photo by Tyrone Rasheed

Carol Maillard,  Louise Robinson, Abdel Salaam, Dyane Harvey-Salaam, and David Robertson at Symphony Space.,

Abdel Salaam and Louis Johnson

Debbie Allen, Louis Johnson, George Faison
Actress and dancer Debbie Allen, Director and choreographer Louis Johnson and dancer George Faison attend AHF and Debbie Allen Present Keeping the Promise-1,000,000 Lives In Care: Celebrating Icons of Dance at The Apollo Theater on November 30, 2018, in New York City. (Monica Schipper/Getty Images for AHF)

 

The Dance Theatre of Harlem’s 50th Anniversary opening night celebration. Honoring the Legacy of Arthur Mitchell (2019) – George Faison, Melony McGant, Dr. Glory Van Scott, and Louis Johnson

Talley Beatty, Dr. Glory Van Scott and Louis Johnson at Talley Beatty’s home in NYC before the Katherine Dunham Gala in January 1979 PHOTO BY AYOKA CHENZIRA, FROM DR. GLORY VAN SCOTT’S PRIVATE COLLECTION

http://amsterdamnews.com/news/2020/apr/16/legendary-choreographer-dancer-director-louis-john/?page=1

“As an active arts educator and teacher, Louis Johnson has conducted Black arts symposiums at Yale, Howard, Virginia State, Hampton Institute and Morehouse College. In 1986 he was appointed the director of the Dance Division of the Henry Street Settlement on the Lower East Side. He has retired.” 

~ ***** ~

Productions Dates of Productions
Play On! [Original, Musical] Mar 20, 1997 – May 11, 1997
  • Creative Consultant: Louis Johnson
Treemonisha [Original, Musical, Opera] Oct 21, 1975 – Dec 14, 1975
  • Choreographed by Louis Johnson
  • Also Starring: The Louis Johnson Dance Theatre [Treemonisha Dancer]
Purlie [Revival, Musical, Comedy] Dec 27, 1972 – Jan 7, 1973
  • Choreographed by Louis Johnson
Lost in the Stars [Revival, Musical, Tragedy] Apr 18, 1972 – May 21, 1972
  • Choreographed by Louis Johnson
Les Blancs [Original, Play] Nov 15, 1970 – Dec 19, 1970
  • Ritual: Louis Johnson
Purlie [Original, Musical, Comedy] Mar 15, 1970 – Nov 6, 1971
  • Choreographed by Louis Johnson
Hallelujah, Baby! [Original, Musical] Apr 26, 1967 – Jan 13, 1968
  • Performer: Louis Johnson
    • Ensemble – Replacement
  • Understudy: Louis Johnson
    • Tip – Replacement
    • Tap – Replacement
Kwamina [Original, Musical] Oct 23, 1961 – Nov 18, 1961
  • Performer: Louis Johnson [Dancer]
House of Flowers [Original, Musical] Dec 30, 1954 – May 21, 1955
  • Performer: Louis Johnson [Townsperson]
My Darlin’ Aida [Original, Musical] Oct 27, 1952 – Jan 10, 1953
  • Performer: Louis Johnson [Dancer]
Four Saints in Three Acts [Revival, Musical, Opera] Apr 16, 1952 – Apr 27, 1952
  • Performer: Louis Johnson [Dancer]
  • Dunning, Jennifer. “Louis Johnson: ‘I Love Dance–Any Kind of Dance’.” NEW YORK TIMES, September 28, 1975, Sec. 2, p. 6. Goodman, Saul. “Brief Biographies: Louis Johnson.” DANCE MAGAZINE (August 1956). Source Citation: “Louis Johnson.” ENCYCLOPEDIA OF AFRICAN-AMERICAN CULTURE AND HISTORY. 5 vols. Macmillan, 1996. Reprinted by permission of Gale Group.
 

Photo Credit: Tom Scott

Remembering Louis Johnson
BY CUSTOM APRIL 8, 2020
BY WALTER RUTLEDGE

http://outandaboutnycmag.com/4-8-20-oa-nyc-magazine-remembering-louis-johnson/?fbclid=IwAR3QYJxOu49ca0hD_9mVIf-9MclhSL6SQUEaueSBGT97zrIomGKhKEOh_FU

~*~ 

From the Desk of ROBERT HOOKS 

“After knocking out a wall in my 28th Street apartment and building a stage in its living-room for theatre classes at my brand new (and very first) New York theatre company, The Group Theatre Workshop (circa 1964)- I was immediately evicted (no surprise) and had to quickly find a new living space and workshop classes for the fledgling young theatre group. Enter Louis Johnson, a Broadway dancer who I had met through Barbara Ann Teer was kind enough to vouch for me- to rent a spacious loft in his building on 19th Street off 5th Avenue.            From that amazingly creative period until yesterday, Louis and I were true friends, collaborators and theatre colleagues in all three of my successful theatre institutions over the many glorious years we shared in the ’60s, ’70s and 80’s American Black theatre movement. An accomplished dancer, choreographer, director and teacher, Louis Johnson was the premier choreographer at the world-famous Negro Ensemble Company and Washington’s DC Black Repertory Company!… RIP,  Dear Louis.”

    • “After knocking out a wall in my 28th Street apartment and building a stage in its living-room for theatre classes at my brand new (and very first) New York theatre company, The Group Theatre Workshop (circa 1964)- I was immediately evicted (no surprise) and had to quickly find a new living space and workshop classes for the fledgling young theatre group. Enter Louis Johnson, a Broadway dancer who I had met through Barbara Ann Teer was kind enough to vouch for me- to rent a spacious loft in his building on 19th Street off 5th Avenue. From that amazingly creative period until yesterday, Louis and I were true friends, collaborators and theatre colleagues in all three of my successful theatre institutions over the many glorious years we shared in the ’60s, ’70s and 80s American Black theatre movement. An accomplished dancer, choreographer, director and teacher, Louis Johnson was the premier choreographer at the world-famous Negro Ensemble Company and Washington’s DC Black Repertory Company!…   RIP Dear Louis.”
%d bloggers like this: