The Little Rock Nine

Terrence Roberts

Terrence Roberts was born December 3, 1941.  He attended Horace Mann High School before going to Little Rock Central.  After high school he enrolled into California State University where he obtained his Bachelor of Arts in sociology in 1967 (Terrence, 2011).  In 1999 he became employed at Antioch University in Los Angeles California, where he worked as a core faculty member and co-chair of the Master or Arts in psychology program (Terrence, 2011).  Terrence Roberts is currently the CEO of Terrence J. Roberts and Associates, a management-consulting firm (Terrence, 2011).

Gloria Ray

Gloria Ray was born September 26, 1942 in Little Rock Arkansas.  After high school she attended and graduated from Illinois Institute of Technology with a Bachelor’s degree in Chemistry and Math (Gloria, 2012).  Gloria Ray has served as a documentation expert for a Dutch company and editor for a European computer magazine (Gloria, 2012). Gloria Ray now lives in Sweden and the Netherlands (Gloria, 2012)

On September 4, 1957 these nine African American individuals were blocked by an angry mob of over 1,000 white men and women including the governor of Arkansas Orval Faubus and the National Guard of Arkansas (Little Rock, 2010).  President Eisenhower sent United States Army 101st Airborne Division and took over the National Guard commands in order to escort the nine into school safely (Little Rock, 2010).  On September 23, 1957 the nine boys and girls finally made it into the school without harm while the angry mob shouted threats and chants at them (Little Rock, 2010).  Melba Pattillo stated “After 3 full days inside Central, I know that integration is a much bigger word than I thought” (Little Rock, 2010).  However, in 1958 the Federal Court suspended the operation of the federal integration order until 1960-61 school year (Little Rock, 2010).

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A reporter from the Tri-State Defender, Alex Wilson, is shoved by an angry mob of white people near Central High School in Little Rock, Ark., Sept. 23, 1957.  The fight started when nine black students gained entrance to the school as the Army enforced integration.  (AP Photo)

A reporter from the Tri-State Defender, Alex Wilson, is shoved by an angry mob of white people near Central High School in Little Rock, Ark., Sept. 23, 1957. The fight started when nine black students gained entrance to the school as the Army enforced integration. (AP Photo)

This historical event had a great impact on the country.  I could not imagine having to try to go to school and not being allowed in, or having threats made to me while walking into school.  These nine people have made me really reflect and place myself into their shoes.  They had enough courage and strength to enter the school and stay in school until it was closed, whereas many would have probably not even volunteered to go due to the situation during that time period and knowing the danger it would have brought to myself and my family. We should really respect and look up to these nine people for their courage. 

littlerocknine

Student Study Group

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Ernest Green on his graduation day

Ernest Green on his graduation day

Links:

http://en.wikipedia.org

http://encyclopediaofarkansas.net/encyclopedia/entry-detail.aspx?entryID=723