Hattie McDaniel (Actress) – Petition

HATTIE  McDANIEL

1895 * 1952

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By Dale Ricardo Shields 

All Rights Reserved.

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{Petition to replace the stolen Oscar}

http://www.gopetition.com/petition/42042.html 

"Born on June 10, 1895, in Wichita, Kansas, she was one of 13 children and the daughter of former slaves. Her parents introduced her to music and entertainment early on- her father was a Baptist preacher yet also sang and played the banjo in minstrel shows and her mother was a gospel singer. The family moved to Denver in 1901. By high school, Hattie's talents were already starting to shine in school and church; thus began her early career as a singer and a dancer. She often joined her father's minstrel act and toured with other vaudevillian troupes. In 1925, she became one of the first African-American women of radio- and the very first black female voice to sing on the radio. In the early 30's when she moved to L.A., she was able to garner small roles on the radio through her brother, Sam, and sister Etta (already working in radio/film)- which turned into bit roles as extras in films. In order to get by, she took on odd jobs in domestic work while pursuing radio and film work. But in 1934, she landed her first big break on-screen role as a maid in John Ford's JUDGE PRIEST."

“Born on June 10, 1895, in Wichita, Kansas, Hattie was one of 13  children and the daughter of former slaves Henry and Susan McDaniel. Hattie’s father Henry McDaniel fought in the Civil War with the 122nd USCT and his mother, Susan Holbert, was a singer of religious music. In 1900, the family moved to Colorado, living first in Fort Collins and then in Denver, where Hattie graduated from Denver East High School.” (Wikipedia)

 

From the 1860s to the 1960s one of the few employment opportunities for Black women in America was as a domestic servant. Consequently, the Mammy stereotype became the standard characterization of Black women in film and television.

The mammy roles, played by actresses like Hattie McDaniels, Louise Beaver, and Ethel Waters, put a happy face on Black women’s lowly position in society, helping to set at ease the hearts of White audiences. Mammies were so happy to serve Whites that they were shown giving up their pay and even their freedom for the chance to continue serving “their White family”. These images are mixed with news footage of the civil rights movement to show that this was not the case in the real world. 

FAMILY TREE   *  

Henry McDaniel (1845 – 1922)          
Susan McDaniel – (1920)
Otis McDaniel (1882 -1916)*
Samuel McDaniel (1886 – 1962)
Etta McDaniel (1890 -1946)*
Hattie McDaniel (1895 – 1952)

*Ruby McDaniel,Orlena McDaniel,Adele McDaniel, James McDaniel 

Sam McDaniel (Actor) The brother of Oscar-winning actress Hattie McDaniel, he also had a long and prolific movie career. He appeared in 208 films, but seldom got screen credit. Today his name is known only to cinema historians and trivia buffs. His credits include "Hallelujah!" (1929), "The Public Enemy" (1931), "Grand Hotel" (1932), "Footlight Parade" (1933), "Manhattan Melodrama" (1934), "Belle of the Nineties" (1934), "Captains Courageous" (1937), "Jezebel" (1938), "Union Pacific" (1939), "They Died With Their Boots On" (1941), "Son of Dracula" (1943), "Double Indemnity" (1944), "The Egg and I" (1947), "Ma and Pa Kettle" (1949), "Carmen Jones" (1954), "A Hole in the Head" (1959), "Ice Palace" (1960), and "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn" (1960). McDaniel was born in Witchita, Kansas. After 30 years of performing in minstrel troupes he went to Hollywood in 1929, with Hattie McDaniel tagging along. To his surprise, it was his kid sister who became famous. He died at the Motion Picture Country Home. (bio by: Bobb Edwards)

Sam McDaniel
(Actor) The brother of Oscar-winning actress Hattie McDaniel, he also had a long and prolific movie career. He appeared in 208 films but seldom got screen credit. Today his name is known only to cinema historians and trivia buffs. His credits include Hallelujah! (1929), The Public Enemy (1931), Grand Hotel (1932), Footlight Parade(1933), Manhattan Melodrama (1934), Belle of the Nineties (1934), Captains Courageous (1937), Jezebel (1938), Union Pacific (1939), They Died With Their Boots On (1941), Son of Dracula (1943), Double Indemnity (1944), The Egg and I (1947), Ma and Pa Kettle (1949), Carmen Jones (1954), A Hole in the Head (1959), Ice Palace (1960), and The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (1960). McDaniel was born in Witchita, Kansas. After 30 years of performing in minstrel troupes, he went to Hollywood in 1929, with Hattie McDaniel tagging along. To his surprise, it was his kid sister who became famous. He died at the Motion Picture Country Home. (bio by Bobb Edwards)

“McDaniel is familiar to modern viewers for his role as Spiffingham the Butler in the Three Stooges film Heavenly Daze. Having been the only African-American to ever appear in the I Love Lucy series, he was “Sam the Porter” in a 1955 episode of I Love Lucy called “The Great Train Robbery“.”

Etta McDaniel 

Etta McDaniel, sister of renowned character actress Hattie. She was in 61 movies from 1933 to 1946, mostly in maid or mammy roles. Her first film role was as a native in King Kong, and she appeared in such films as Stella Dallas and Son of Dracula. Pictured here in False Faces (1943), a run of the mill Republic Studios murder mystery, with a few extra twists to the script courtesy of writer Curt Siodmak. Paired with slow and querulous Nick (Nicodemus) Stewart as an apartment building maid

Etta McDaniel, sister of renowned character actress Hattie. She was in 61 movies from 1933 to 1946, mostly in maid or mammy roles. Her first film role was as a native in King Kong, and she appeared in such films as Stella Dallas and Son of Dracula.  Pictured here in False Faces(1943), a run-of-the-mill Republic Studios murder mystery, with a few extra twists to the script courtesy of writer Curt Siodmak. Paired with slow and querulous Nick (Nicodemus) Stewart as an apartment building maid.

Etta played uncredited bits, usually as maids and mammies, in 58 films. Perhaps her most memorable moment is in “King Kong” (1933), as the native woman with the coconut bra snatches her baby away from the rampaging ape. Her other credits include The Green Pastures (1936), The Devil Is a Sissy  (1936), Stella  Dallas (1937), Sergeant Madden (1939), Son of Dracula (1943), and The Thin Man Goes Home (1945). McDaniel was born in Witchita, Kansas. She made her performing debut with her seven siblings as a member of H. M. Johnson’s Mighty  Modern Minstrels, a Denver-based vaudeville troupe. In 1933 she settled in  Hollywood.

(bio by Bobb  Edwards)

Otis McDaniel (Brother) Birth: Nov., 1882 Death: Nov., 1916 Entertainer. A noted Vaudevillian, he was the driving force behind the Henry McDaniel Minstrel Show. Brother of Hattie McDaniel. (bio by: Laurie)

Otis McDaniel(Brother)
Birth: Nov. 1882
Death: Nov. 1916
Entertainer. A noted Vaudevillian, he was the driving force behind the Henry McDaniel Minstrel Show. Brother of Hattie McDaniel. (bio by Laurie)

~*~

Her parents introduced her to music and entertainment early on- her father was a Baptist preacher yet also sang and played the banjo in minstrel shows and her mother was a gospel singer. The family moved to Denver in 1901. “McDaniel was one of only two Black children in her elementary school class in Denver. Racial prejudice was less virulent in the West than elsewhere in the United States, and she became something of a favorite at the 24th Street Elementary School for her talents as a singer and reciter of poetry.

Even as a child, according to a letter written to Hattie years later by her teacher, “you had an outstanding dramatic ability, and ability to project to your listeners your strong personality and your ever-present sense of humor.” By high school, Hattie’s talents were already starting to shine in school and church; thus began her early career as a singer and a dancer.

She often joined her father’s (Henry McDaniel Minstrel Show) minstrel act and toured with other vaudevillian troupes. and several other troupes. The minstrel shows, usually performed by Blacks but sometimes by Whites in blackface, presented a variety of entertainments based on caricatures of Black cultural life for the enjoyment of mostly white audiences. With her father’s troupe, which also featured a number of her brothers and sisters, she visited most of the major cities in the western United States while honing the skills that would later make her famous. In addition to performing, Hattie was also a songwriter, a skill she honed while working with her brother’s minstrel show.

After the death of her brother Otis in 1916, the troupe began to lose money, and it wasn’t until 1920 that Hattie got her next big break. During 1920–25, she appeared with Professor George Morrison’s Melody Hounds, a touring Black ensemble, and in the mid-1920s she embarked on a radio career, singing with the Melody Hounds on station KOA in Denver.  In 1925, she became one of the first African-American women of radio- and the very first Black female voice to sing on the radio.