Hattie McDaniel (Actress) – Petition

There is a link to sign a petition to help replace Hattie’s Oscar that was stolen. Please do your part in helping Hattie McDaniels by clicking the link below or copying the address as a new URL: http://www.gopetition.com/petition/42042.html

Please click here to sign the petition asking the industry to replace Hattie McDaniel’s Oscar http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hattie_McDaniel Musical Opens on Life of Hattie McDaniel and Supports Campaign To Replace Her lost Academy Award (Los Angeles) The American Legacy Magazine presented on March 4th, 2011, the opening of the one-woman musical, “Hattie…What one-woman To Know” staring award-winning Actress Vickilyn Reynolds. The musical documents the life of Hattie McDaniel, the first African American Academy Award Winner. The musical played the first three weekends in March at Stage 52 Playhouse, 5299, W. Washington Blvd., Los Angeles, California 90016.  The musical honors McDaniel’s life and is the labor of love of Vickilyn Reynolds who has dedicated over 10 years to developing the musical and educating the world about McDaniels contributions to the arts and society. During the run of the show in Denver, Reynolds received the nomination for the Denver Post Ovation Award. While in New York, she received the Vivian Robinson/AUDELCO Award for Outstanding Performance in a musical/female.

 

Most people only see Hattie as a maid or mammy and know very little of her life as an activist and her many contributions to film and broadcasting. I want this musical to entertain and educate. March is Women’s History Month and this musical is performed by a woman, directed by a woman, and is about a woman who paved the way for all African Americans in film,” Vicki Lynn Reynolds.

.  Please click here to sign the petition asking the industry to replace Hattie McDaniel’s Oscar.

Give Hattie McDaniel an Oscar; Support the replacement of her plaque Petition

Hattie McDaniel by Patrick Smith - PatrickSmithArt

Hattie McDaniel by Patrick Smith – PatrickSmithArt

For all the dramatic highs and lows of Hattie McDaniel’s life, she lived it as she chose.  Surrounded by friends, she enjoyed the pleasures of the privileged life in Hollywood that her high film and radio salaries afforded her for as long as they lasted, and her many career accomplishments demonstrated that hard work and determination, more than race, affected how high a performer could progress up the Hollywood ladder in the 1930s and ’40s.

Filmography of Hattie McDaniel

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hattie_McDaniel
Give Hattie McDaniel an Oscar; Support the replacement of her plaque Petition

 

Women's History Tribute: A little late today but we want to celebrate Hattie McDaniel tonight. A lot of people don't hold her in high esteem because of the roles she portrayed as an actress and lack of participation in as many Civil Rights protests as other entertainers but we want to celebrate the singer-songwriter, comedian, stage actress, radio performer, and television star for being the first African American to win an Academy Award, the first Black Oscar winner to have a postage stamp, the first Black woman to sing on the radio in the United States, for appearing in over 300 films, for trying to eliminate the use of the "N-word" from the "Gone with the Wind" script and for leading anti-segregation efforts in her Los Angeles neighborhood but most importantly for her ability persevere and for being successful despite the presence of rampant racism and brutal adversity in the entertainment industry. I mean she couldn't even attend the Atlanta premiere of the movie that she won an Academy Award for and had to sit in a segregated table at the award ceremony when she accepted her Academy Award.

Hattie McDaniel. A lot of people don’t hold her in high esteem because of the roles she portrayed as an actress and lack of participation in as many Civil Rights protests as other entertainers. A singer-songwriter, comedian, stage actress, radio performer, and television star and the first African American to win an Academy Award, the first Black Oscar winner to have a postage stamp, the first Black woman to sing on the radio in the United States, and appearing in over 300 films, for trying to eliminate the use of the “N-word” from the film “Gone with the Wind” script, leading anti-segregation efforts in her Los Angeles neighborhood but most importantly for her ability persevere and for being successful despite the presence of rampant racism and brutal adversity in the entertainment industry.
She couldn’t even attend the Atlanta premiere of the movie that she won an Academy Award for and had to sit at a segregated table at the award ceremony when she accepted her Academy Award.